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Podcast: Unlocking Physical Security Costs

06/20/2017

Unlocking physical security costs - ASSA ABLOY

In Episode 2 of the new podcast Unlocked, Assa Abloy takes you on the journey of an IT Director at a small college as he navigates through the sometimes choppy waters of purchasing and implementing a new door access system for his campus. Hear some best practices from a leading integrator on how you can avoid some of the pitfalls when starting your own physical security project.

5 Tips for Beginning a Campus Security Project

  • Start by asking the questions
  • Walk around and do a quality check on your own before engaging an outsider
  • Next, talk with a security expert you trust
  • Basic cost estimates are easy to get from providers
  • Finally, watch out for factors that will impact your timeline

Listen to the Unlocking Physical Security Costs podcast HERE.

Unlocking Physical Security Costs White Paper

SlideShare: 5 Tips for Beginning a Campus Security Project

Source: futurelab.assaabloy.com

 


What is Paxton BLU?

05/12/2017

Greater emphasis on the cloud for digital IDs

Paxton BLU is a cloud-based access control system. The system can be managed from anywhere via any Internet connected PC or smart device.

Paxton BLU offers a flexible approach to site security as it can be configured without a local server* and is therefore ideal for a range of applications, including remote or unmanned sites, where previously access control has not been an option.
Paxton BLU also offers the added benefit of a dealer managed system, allowing user and site administration to be conducted without repeat visits.

Why Paxton BLU?

Flexibility – Customer Convenience

  • Cloud based – access from anywhere with internet connection, via PC or smart device
  • Ideal for a range of sites, including those where traditional access control is not an option
  • Ultimate flexibility - multi-user, multi-site
  • Highly scalable - secure thousands of sites
  • Expandable functionality via API integration

Simplicity – Get the Job Done Quicker

  • Simple set up with no local server or network* required
  • Simple token administration, on site & remotely
  • Quick, hassle free installation
  • No network or IT support needed with 3G modem option

Security – Offer Peace of Mind

  • Powered by Amazon Web Services™, offering complete security
  • No manual back up needed, no concerns about a server failure

Opportunity to Build Recurring Monthly Revenue

  • Significantly increase value to your customers by offering additional services
  • Increase long term profitability for your company by creating a reliable, recurring customer base
  • Develop a consistent and predictable revenue stream throughout your business cycle
  • Offer more competitive installation rates

Source: paxton-access.com

 


Greater emphasis on the cloud for digital IDs

05/02/2017

Greater emphasis on the cloud for digital IDs

HID Global continue predicting trends for Identity in 2017. Next up is a greater emphasis on the cloud. By combining on-premises and the cloud, “hybrid solutions” will create common management platforms for digital IDs.

HID Global focuses on four significant trends in 2017 that will influence how organizations create, manage and use trusted identities in a broad range of existing and new use cases.

The forecast for 2017 is based on a breakthrough in adoption of mobile identity technology in 2016. Exemplifying industry-wide trending, HID Global experienced tremendous uptick in customer deployments of its broad mobility solutions and has a strong pipeline of future customer installations in the works to make verification of identities optimized for mobile applications.

Common management platforms for digital IDs

Organizations are recognizing the interdependencies of technologies and platforms needed for business agility, cost management and providing a better user experience within a mobile workforce, or for digital commerce and relationship management that continues to require more reach, flexibility, security.

In banking, government, healthcare and other regulated markets, multi-factor authentication for physical and IT access control will have more opportunities to merge into integrated systems that will also provide a more convenient experience for users and increase security.

This model will make it easier for administrators to deploy and maintain an integrated system throughout the complete identity lifecycle — from onboarding to offboarding.

It will make it possible to monitor and manage employees’ access rights as their role changes within an organization, ensuring employees only have access to what they need in a current role.

Credential issuance for physical ID cards will experience a digital transformation, as the use of cloud technologies will enable managed service models for badge printing and encoding.

Source: FutureLab.AssaaAbloy.com

 


Unlocking Campus Lockdown

04/03/2017

Unlocking Campus Lockdown - Assa Abloy

Active shooter emergencies are a reality on today's campuses. On this first episode of Unlocked, Assa Abloy takes a look at what can go wrong during these emergencies and what can be done to make sure students, staff and faculty are kept safe. Learn about the different lockdown procedures and protocols, and why every campus needs to have a good emergency preparedness plan in place.

5 Principles of Effective Campus Lockdowns

  • Lockdown is a functional protocol used to protect campuses
  • Emergency preparedness plan should be specific
  • Staff is more likely to initiate lockdown when there are different levels for various types of emergencies
  • Balance open campus culture with security
  • Emergency training should be a top priority

Source: http://futurelab.assaabloy.com/en/podcast-unlocking-campus-lockdown/

 


New tests for smoke alarms and detectors coming soon

03/20/2017

New tests for smoke alarms and detectors coming soon.

In order to improve the detection of fires from synthetic materials and to reduce unwanted alarms, new tests have been developed for smoke alarms.

In addition to the long established tests, beginning in May 29, 2020, all smoke alarms seeking to be listed as complying with the ANSI/UL 217 product standard will have to pass new flaming and smoldering polyurethane (PU) foam tests as well as a new cooking nuisance resistance test. Ultimately the new tests will be added to the ANSI/UL 268 smoke detector product standard with the same effective date. Smoke detection manufacturers are in the process of redesigning or developing new products to meet the new requirements.

The PU fire tests were needed to address changes in materials used for interior furnishings and building materials. Forty years ago, the interior furnishings found in homes, hotel guest rooms, dormitories, and offices were primarily made of natural materials like cotton, wood, wool, linen, or silk. Most furniture available in the last 20 years utilizes polyurethane foam for padding, and polyester or nylon for furniture coverings, carpet, and drapes. The reason for this transition is synthetic materials are less expensive, easier to clean, and more resistant to normal wear and tear than natural materials. Also, during the mid-1980’s, construction methods changed from using solid wood lumber like  2X4’s, 2X6’s, and 2X12’s for studs, trusses, and joists to widespread use of “Engineered Lumber,” which is made from wood and synthetic epoxies. This transition occurred because engineered lumber is less expensive and lighter than real wood, while also being just as strong.

With the widespread use of synthetic materials, the smoke characteristics of fires today are considerably different than in the 1970’s. There are numerous reports that demonstrate that fires from synthetic materials burn hotter and faster than natural materials used in the past. The 2008 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report titled Performance of Home Smoke Alarms Analysis of the Response of Several Available Technologies in Residential Fire Settings concluded that people today have 3 minutes of available safe escape time in “flaming” fires, compared to 17 minutes in the late 1970’s.

The cooking nuisance resistance test was necessary to meet a new requirement in the 2013 edition of NFPA 72®,National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code. Section 29.8.3.4(5) requires all smoke alarms and smoke detectors installed between 6 feet and 20 feet from a stationary or fixed cooking appliance to be listed for resistance to normal cooking activities, such as pan frying, sautéing, and baking. A future effective date of January 1, 2016 was established to allow for the development of a cooking-resistant test in the product standards and to allow manufacturers time to design and get their products listed. The new requirement was needed because normal cooking activities are the leading cause of unwanted alarms.

For the 2016 edition of NFPA 72, the effective date was changed to January 1, 2019, as the cooking nuisance resistance test had not been finalized. It was estimated that an additional three years would be needed to gather the technical data, develop the performance tests, obtain approval from the UL Standards Technical Panel (STP), as well as to allow time for manufacturers to design, test, and list their products.

The new flaming and smoldering PU foam tests as well as the nuisance resistance test will become part of UL/ANSI 217 for smoke alarms and ANSI/UL 268 for smoke detectors. UL recently announced their certification laboratory will not require smoke alarms or smoke detectors to comply with the new tests until May 29, 2020. An effort is underway to change the date for the 2019 edition of NFPA 72 and to promulgate a tentative interim amendment (TIA) for the 2016 edition of NFPA 72 to align with the May 29, 2020 date in the aforementioned product standards. Because of the NFPA code development processes, no change can be made to the 2013 edition.

At this time there are no smoke alarms or smoke detectors that meet the new tests. As a result, many stakeholders are of the opinion that jurisdictions that have or are in the process of adopting the 2013 or 2016 editions of NFPA 72 need to revise the effective date of section 29.8.3.4(5).

Source: SystemSensor.com

 


Why schools need carbon monozide detectors

03/07/2017

Why schools need carbon monoxide detectors

March 17, 2014, started off just like any other day: I dropped off my five-year-old son Ryan at the Douglas Municipal Center, adjacent to the Douglas Elementary School. He hurried inside the municipal center, where kindergarten is held, along with 76 other kindergartners and their teachers. The weather was cold, so the building's heating system was on. No one realized that somewhere inside the building a furnace was leaking a deadly gas and everybody inside was in danger.

It's hard to describe the range of emotions I felt that day as I worried for my young son, who was one of many students taken in an ambulance to a nearby hospital for evaluation and treatment. After I was notified, I dashed to the Douglas Elementary School next door where the children and staff had been transported to assess their condition. I couldn't see my son right away for the crowd of emergency responders, students and faculty members. I was so nervous for him. I knew he would be scared. He was five years old. This was followed by moments of panic, fear, and then relief.

Ultimately, none of the students suffered significant lasting effects from the carbon monoxide exposure, but I will never forget that day -- and I'm sure none of the other parents, teachers, or emergency responders will, either.

It's October now and our students are in school as the turns colder and another heating season begins. When they enter the classroom each morning, most will face the same risk as the Douglas students: potential exposure to carbon monoxide (CO). Almost every school in Massachusetts has at least some equipment that can emit CO -- including furnaces, water heaters, and gas stoves -- meaning there is always risk of exposure if something goes wrong.

Over time, CO levels as low as 70 parts per million (a mix of.007% carbon monoxide and 99.993% oxygen) can cause headaches, fatigue, and nausea. At 150 parts per million, sustained exposure can lead to disorientation, unconsciousness, or death in a healthy adult. You can't smell or sense CO, and every year more than 400 people in this country die from exposure to it -- not to mention some 20,000 related emergency room and hospital visits.

The symptoms are too easy to ignore (headaches, nausea) -- particularly when you factor in all the things on a teacher's mind in a classroom full of children. Wouldn't it be better to protect against the risk in the first place?

The Massachusetts Legislature is considering a bill, House Bill 4103, that would do just that: help keep school-age children safe from the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning by requiring every school in the Commonwealth to install adequate CO detection to alert staff and administrators when CO is present anywhere in the school. When the alarms go off, everyone will know to exit the building. The bill is being considered by the House Ways and Means Committee, and although the formal session is over, legislation is frequently passed in the informal session (albeit under different legislative procedures). If passed, the bill would also require CO detection in new or substantially remodeled restaurants.

A similar bill advanced through the legislature last session but failed to pass over concerns regarding the cost of implementation. But aren't the limited costs well worth the safety of our school children? On average, it would cost $12,000 for each school to purchase and install the appropriate level of CO detection. There are about 1,900 public and charter K–12 schools in Massachusetts, with 950,000 students. At $12,000 per school that's an average of just $24 per student. When compared to the entire state budget for 2017 ($40 billion), $24 per kid is minuscule.

Some of the newer schools already have CO detection, while others likely wouldn't need much more than an upgrade. I applaud school officials, including those in my hometown of Douglas, who have acted to install CO detection to keep their students and staff safe without being compelled to do so by legislative mandate. But unfortunately, what that means is that some students are protected while others are not.

That doesn't seem fair to me. It wasn't fair for the students in Waltham at Henry Whittemore Elementary School in January, who were evacuated because a faulty boiler leaked concentrated levels of CO. It certainly wasn't fair for the two staff members at Franklin Elementary School in Newton, who were found unconscious in the boiler room last October. And it sure wasn't fair to the 16 kindergartners at the Douglas Municipal Center who were rushed to the hospital that fateful morning two-and-a-half years ago. Had detection equipment been present in each of these schools there would have been zero hospital trips and no unconscious bodies.

Massachusetts is by no means the only state where CO leaks occur. But other states are acting. Utah had a near-tragedy in 2013 when 40 students and staff members at an elementary school were exposed and had to be rushed to medical facilities. Four months later, the Utah legislature passed a bill to require CO detection in every school. We've had three incidents in the last 30 months -- and yet our legislature has passed nothing. We need to join states such as Utah, Colorado, Illinois, New York, and Connecticut (all cold-weather states like ours) and require CO detectors in all our school buildings.

And our schools are not the only facilities that need CO detection devices because CO is a risk in any building with equipment that burns fossil fuels (oil, gas, wood) for water heaters, ovens and gas furnaces. The exhaust from cars also contains CO, so enclosed garages also pose a risk. Within the last few years, CO-related deaths have occurred at a hotel in NC and a restaurant (Legal Seafood) in NY – not counting the many instances where building occupants were exposed for some time without knowing it before experiencing symptoms and being evacuated.

Please don't take this occurrence lightly. It's only a matter of time before we have another one. When we send our children off to school, we know where they are all day, and we expect them to be safe. Massachusetts officials must pass House Bill 4103. Our students are at risk until they do.

-- About the author: Pamela Morrissette, a Douglas resident, is president of Morrissette & Son Electrical Contractors Inc. of Whitinsville. She and her husband, Jason, have three children.

Link to original story: http://www.telegram.com/opinion/20161004/as-i-see-it-why-schools-need-carbon-monoxide-detectors

Source: SystemSensor.com

 


Low Frequency Requirements Sound Confusing, But They're Necessary

02/21/2017

Low frequency requirements sound confusing, but they're necessary

The wording of the 520 Hz signal requirement in NFPA 72®: 2010 and 2013 has caused some confusion. In general, low frequency sounders take the place of standard sounders in commercial sleeping spaces. However, there’s far more to know about the newly enacted requirement.

A significant change in NFPA 72, The National Fire Alarm Signaling Code, became effective January 1, 2014 – the 520 Hz low frequency audible fire alarm signal is required in all sleeping areas of newly constructed hotel guest rooms and dormitory sleeping rooms. What does this change mean for you? The short answer is: it depends. And confusion regarding the wording in the 2010 and 2013 editions of NFPA 72 is partly to blame for the difficulty in providing a definitive answer.

Chapter 18

Section 18.4.5.3 of NFPA 72: 2010 requires that after January 1, 2014, the low frequency audible fire alarm signal be provided in areas to wake people sleeping in occupancies having a protected premises (building) fire alarm system. The Chapter 18 committee chose to apply the requirement to all sleeping areas – not just those where occupants have self identified as having a hearing impairment. This was done intentionally for several reasons: For example, many people may not know they have a hearing impairment. In addition, the low frequency signal has proven very effective at waking children under the age of 10 and people with alcohol impairments.

In NFPA 72: 2013, the Chapter 18 text was slightly changed to clarify that the low frequency requirements were intended to “awaken” people who are sleeping only. The low-frequency signal is not required in the hallway of a hotel or dormitory, but it is required in hotel guest rooms.

The low frequency tone benefits not only the hard of hearing, but also children, deep sleepers, and people impaired by alcohol or medications. The tone gives these individuals a higher chance of waking when a fire occurs. In fact, studies have shown the low frequency signal is six to ten times more effective at waking children, heavy sleepers, and people with hearing loss than current high-pitched alarms, which operate at around 3 kilohertz.

Specifically, the 520 Hz low frequency signal is required in the sleeping areas of these types of buildings:

  • Hotels/motels
  • College/university dormitories
  • Retirement/assisted-living facilities (without trained staff responsible for waking up patients)
  • Apartments/condominiums

As a result, any of these new buildings with sleeping areas will now need to include low frequency sounders as part of the fire and life safety system. The requirement may extend to those that are upgrading or retrofitting existing fire and life safety systems within those types of buildings.

What about sleeping accommodations in occupancies such as hospitals and detention or correctional facilities? These applications do not require low frequency sounders. In a hospital, a low frequency tone could unnecessarily awaken patients, which would be detrimental to their care. Instead, a standard audible fire alarm signal notifies staff members who will then awaken and relocate patients who are in danger. Regular, required fire drills prepare staff members in the case of an emergency.

Chapter 24

Low frequency requirements have also been added to Chapter 24, which covers emergency communications systems, such as in-building fire EVAC systems and mass notification systems. Section 24.4.2.4.2 requires a low frequency signal in sleeping areas to be followed by a voice message to communicate information to people who could be asleep, except in occupancies listed in 24.4.2.4.3. The reason for this provision is to comply with the NFPA 72 and UL 864 requirement for the voice evacuation message to be preceded by two cycles of the temp 3 audible alarm signal.

Section 24.4.2.4.3 does not require a low frequency signal in occupancies where the voice system is used to communicate to occupants who are awake. For example, in a hospital, the voice message is used to notify staff members who are already awake. The staff will then respond to the appropriate location in the hospital to carry out their duties, which could include waking and relocating patients in potential danger.

Chapter 29

Finally, low frequency requirements have been added to Chapter 29. The scope of this chapter covers all occupancies that are required to install smoke alarms or household fire alarm systems. In accordance with 29.3.8 and 29.3.8.1, the low frequency signal is required in sleeping areas for people with mild-to-severe hearing loss where required by governing laws, codes, or standards, as well as where provided voluntarily for people with hearing loss.

To summarize the NFPA 72 low frequency requirements, Chapter 18 and Chapter 29 have different scopes. Chapter 18 requires the low frequency signal in all sleeping areas to wake people sleeping in occupancies having a protected premises fire alarm system. Unlike Chapter 18, Chapter 29 does not require the low frequency signal in all sleeping areas. Instead, Chapter 29 requires the low frequency signal in areas to wake up people with mild-to-severe hearing loss only. Also the scope of Chapter 29 covers occupancies where smoke alarms and household fire alarm systems are installed.

Beyond NFPA 72

Low frequency requirements go beyond the reach of NFPA 72. In response to the NFPA 72 changes for low frequency smoke and fire alarms in sleeping rooms, the 2012 International Fire Code (IFC)/ International Building Code (IBC) indirectly requires a low frequency signal in certain occupancies because the 2010 edition of NFPA 72 is referenced in Chapter 80 of the IFC and Chapter 35 of the IBC.

Section 907.2 in the 2012 edition of the IFC/IBC requires a fire alarm system to be installed in new buildings in accordance with NFPA 72 and provide occupant notification in accordance with section

907.5. Section 907.5 requires the activation of a fire alarm system to send a signal to the control unit and then provide occupant notification throughout all occupied areas of the building, including both common and tenant spaces. Common spaces are the corridors, lobbies, or meeting rooms. Tenant spaces are dwelling units within apartment buildings, guest rooms of hotels, or dormitory sleeping rooms. The basic purpose of a fire alarm system is to alert all occupants in the building. It’s important to point out that the requirements in NFPA 72 and section 907.2 of the IFC do not apply retroactively to existing systems.

This translates to providing low frequency sounders in sleeping units in newly constructed Group R-1 hotels and motels, as well as in R-2 colleges, universities, and apartment buildings where there is a protective premise fire alarm system in the building. There are two exceptions to the Group R-1 requirement:

  1. A manual fire alarm system is not required in buildings not more than two stories in height where all individual sleeping units have an exit directly to the public way, egress  court, or yard
  2. Permits the fire alarm system to be activated by a sprinkler system and provide occupant notification

Regarding Group R-1 and Group R-2 occupancies: It is very common to have a building fire alarm system with smoke alarms installed in the sleeping rooms of Group R-1 and R-2 occupancies. Section 907.2.9 of the 2012 IFC requires Group R-1 and R-2 occupancies to have a fire alarm system that activates the occupant notification system throughout all occupied areas of the building, including sleeping areas with dwelling units, by either pull stations or a sprinkler system. That means the low frequency signal (activated by the building fire alarm system) is required in all sleeping rooms.

Section 29.3.8.1 of NFPA 72: 2013 exempts smoke alarms, installed in the sleeping rooms, from the low frequency signal requirement. In this application, there will be two different signals in the sleeping rooms:

  1. Low frequency signal activated by the fire alarm system
  2. The standard 3 Khz signal from the smoke alarm

Not every local jurisdiction has adopted the 2010 or 2013 version of NFPA 72, but an increasing number of jurisdictions have. Remember to follow manufacturer instructions, as well as your local building/code regulations, for the use and installation of any audible visible notification devices.

Applications

Overall, the takeaway is that each application must be evaluated on its own merits. Each application –hotel and motel guest rooms, dorms, and so on – requires a careful study to determine the suitability of systems to meet associated codes. It is not always one or the other; each application has its associated suitability versus code requirements.

Source: SystemSensorBlog.com

 


Low Frequency Requirements: When, Where, and Why?

01/30/2017

Low Frequency Requirements:
When, Where, and Why?

Did you know that, effective January 1, 2014, a low frequency audible fire alarm signal is required in all sleeping areas of newly constructed hotel guest rooms and dormitory sleeping rooms?

That's right: Section 18.4.5.3 in the 2010 and 2013 editions of NFPA 72 requires a frequency signal with a fundamental frequency of 520 Hz to awaken people in occupancies with a protected premises fire alarm system. Even though this new requirement was published in 2009, a lot of confusion remains since the implementation date was just this January.

The intent of the new requirement is to improve waking effectiveness, because smoke alarms and fire alarm systems are most valuable when occupants are asleep. This observation is illustrated in a 2010 U.S. Fire Administration study, which reports that 50% of residential fire fatalities occur between 10 PM and 6 AM. And according to a 2008 Dorothy Bruck study, most unimpaired adults wake up quickly to the so-called standard audible signal, even at levels well below 75 dBA. The majority of fire alarm horns will signal with a frequency range between 2 KHz and 4 KHz. Also, integral sounders in nearly all smoke alarms produce a 3 KHz audible alarm signal.

However, how effective is that standard signal at waking up high-risk population segments such as school-age children, the elderly, and the hearing impaired? A U.S. Fire Administration study revealed that 13% of residential fire fatality victims are less than 10 years old and it's suspected that over 27% of civilian fatalities in residential building fires are linked to alcohol, drug, or chemical influence. Additionally, more than 34.5 million people in the United States are hard of hearing.

In 2006, the NFPA petitioned two research projects from the Fire Protection Research Foundation (FPRF) to study audible fire alarm signal effectiveness in high-risk groups: Waking Effectiveness of Alarms for Adults Who Are Hard of Hearing, and Waking Effectiveness of Alarms for the Alcohol Impaired. The studies reached the following conclusions:

  • The low frequency, 520 Hz signal is the most effective. It woke up 92% of hard of hearing participants when presented at or below 75 dBA for 30 seconds.
  • In comparison, the standard 3 KHz signal woke up 56% at or below 75 dBA.
  • The low frequency signal is superior to bed and pillow shakers and strobe lights.

Sleeping areas affected by the low frequency requirement include hotel rooms, dormitory rooms, and possibly dwelling unit bedrooms within apartment buildings – occupancies like hospital patient rooms are excluded because trained staff is responsible for waking patients. The Chapter 18 Committee specifically chose to apply the requirement to all sleeping areas, not just those where occupants have self-identified hearing impairments. This was done because many people may not know they have a hearing impairment, and also because the low frequency signal has proven effective at waking up people with alcohol impairments.

Based on IFC/IBC and NFPA 72 provisions, after January 1, 2014, the low frequency signal is required in several Group R sleeping unit occupancies where there is a protected premises fire alarm system to activate the occupant notification system: for example, Group R-1 occupancies like hotels and Group R-2 occupancies like college dormitories. Section 907.2 of the IFC/IBC (2012) requires fire alarm system installation in new buildings in accordance with NFPA 72, but said requirements don't retroactively apply to existing systems unless an AHJ mandates otherwise. Furthermore, Section 907.5 makes it clear that fire alarm system activation must first send a signal to the control unit and then alert every building occupant in all occupied areas, including common and tenant spaces. Remember, a fire alarm system's basic purpose is to alert all building occupants.

Source: SystemSensorBlog.com

 


Consider eDist Security Your Dedicated IP Resource

11/16/2016
We Are Here to Guide You Home!

Consider Us Your Dedicated IP Resource

Rely on eDist Security to ensure that your system's camera streams flow where they need to go. Receive personalized customer service and technical support from our team of dedicated Application Specialists that are here to guide you in successfully navigating the waters of emerging technologies in the world of IP.

Content Image
All you have to do is bring us the application and watch as we construct customized solutions specifically designed for your needs:

All you have to do is bring us the application and watch as we construct customized solutions specifically designed for your needs:

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Managed or Unmanaged Network Switches | PoE Power Budgets | Fiber | Linking | Media Converting
Wireless Point to Point | Mesh Networks
Routers | Network over Power Line

Managed or Unmanaged Network Switches | PoE Power Budgets | Fiber | Linking | Media Converting
Wireless Point to Point | Mesh Networks
Routers | Network over Power Line

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Let Us Help You Build Your IP Business

Contact your dedicated Application Specialist today to learn
more about our stock of over 20 different models of PoE switches
along with a comprehensive selection of labor saving solutions
to help you get where you need to be.

Learn More

ipsystems@edist.com I 800.800.6624 ext. 1537

 


Experience All of the Benefits of eDist Security’s Training Room

09/29/2016

Experience all of the benefits of eDist Security

Did you know that eDist Security's corporate headquarters in Mahwah, New Jersey houses an industry specific training room that was designed exclusively for you?

This learning annex was created to provide all of our customers with the essential resources and tools that are vital in facilitating their growth and success.

eDist Security

Here's a brief look at the rewards that eDist Security's training room has to offer:

  • Personalized guidance on how to become an expert in all areas of the security industry, ranging from CCTV Systems, IP Video Solutions and Fire Detection Systems to Access Control, Automation, Commercial & Residential Intrusion and more!
  • Experienced Systems Design, a specialty of ours. Consider eDist to be a vital part of your design team in creating cost effective integrated systems for business and industry.
  • Technical Support and Training so that you are equipped to successfully embrace new technologies, industry opportunities and product applications.
  • Consultations offered by our dedicated team of specially trained industry experts and solutions providers. *Pre-programmed products, ensuring it is ready-to-go when it arrives on site – saving you and your IT staff installation and deployment time.
  • Solution Customization allowing you to experience the benefits of specifically implemented plans designed to deliver optimal performance and results for you and your customers.
  • Presentations designed with content that goes beyond product features, and digs deep into the technology properties, allowing you to get the most out of each and every opportunity.

Let us help you drive your business forward! Contact Mike Weinstein and visit the eDist Security Training Room today!

 


eDist Security to Attend CEDIA Expo 2015 in Dallas, TX to Promote Hikvision® and Onkyo® and Other Product Lines in Quality Home Technology

10/13/2015

eDist Security is attending CEDIA Expo 2015 as the Reliable Distributor for Integration and Automation Experts

MAHWAH, NJ - OCTOBER 13, 2015

eDist Security is set to attend the Cedia Expo 2015 in Dallas, TX at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center, on October 14-17, 2015. As a CEDIA member, eDist Security, is exhibiting for the first time at this yearly event to promote their extensive line of quality Home Technology products available to dealers nationwide. In addition to the Onkyo suite of products, eDist will be promoting one of their newest lines, Hikvision, the innovative leader in video surveillance products.

“To say we are excited to be exhibiting at the CEDIA Expo 2015 this year is an understatement. We have been looking forward to this event all year as it will provide us an opportunity to expose not only our current dealers to some of the newest additions to our product line up, but introduce eDist Security to an entirely new group of Home Technology installers. By providing the best and most innovative products to our dealers, we are able to continue our commitment to being the Premier Wholesale Distributor for Security and Automation,” said Nick Scarane, President of eDist Security. “As an added bonus to current and future dealers, eDist Security is providing a 10% discount promotion for all orders made at the event. We encourage all installers interested in hearing more about our solutions and product lines, to come to Booth 1002. They can also enter to win a $500 eDist Gift Card,” stated Scarane.    

About eDist Security: 
eDist Security provides a diverse line of products and solutions to their dealers from over 250 leading vendors such as Interlogix, DSC, Napco, and Alarm.com to name just a few. They understand the specific needs of the integration and home automation expert and excel at providing their dealers with customized solutions. eDist is constantly working with vendors to provide on-site training to keep both the sales team and dealers up to date on the latest technology and innovative products available. In addition to pre and post-sales support, eDist also offers a robust Partnership Rewards Program to all approved dealers on qualified purchases.

For more information about eDist Security and their 40-year history serving the independent dealer, visit http://security.edist.com/

 


Calling all Monitronics Dealers!

10/08/2014

Hey Monitronics Dealers; Wondering what’s in it for you when you decide to use eDist Security as your value added distributor? Below is a list of the top 5 reasons to sign up with eDist Security.

1. Contract Pricing

You heard right! eDist has negotiated with Monitronics to become a preferred Monitronics Distributor and be able to provide special contract pricing to all Monitronics Dealers.

2. eDist Partner Program

When you purchase $25,000 in products from eDist, you automatically qualify to become part of the eDist Partner Program and earn up to 2% back in co-op marketing dollars on all purchases through eDist. These funds can be used to finance your next marketing initiative in order to continue to support the growth of your organization. Templated marketing materials are available on the eDist Security Marketing Portal or get custom-designed pieces from our preferred marketing agency. Learn more

3. Wide Product Selection

eDist has also partnered with a wide variety of Monitronics-approved vendors and manufacturers including DSC, 2GIG, Alarm.com and Interlogix. They carry a variety of products from each vendor and are always looking to expand their product lines with the latest in innovative products and solutions, keeping dealers on the cutting edge of home intrusion and automation technology.

4. 1-2-Day Shipping

With seven locations throughout the U.S., eDist Security has the ability to deliver your inventory needs within 1- 2 days to most locations. Coupled with electronics billing, RFID tracking and a friendly staff available to assist you in ordering, eDist Security is able to get the products you need delivered quickly.

5. Technical Support and Training

eDist Security, as part of their value added services, provides both technical support and training for dealers. Get a walk-through of installing a new home automation system or visit the showroom near you for our counter days and learn about new products being introduced on the market. The staff is knowledgeable and experienced working with a variety of product lines and are eager to assist you in expanding your own knowledgebase.

The partnership between eDist and Monitronics provides current Monitronics Dealers with even more support, incentives and benefits. The time to become an eDist Dealer has never been better.

Become a Monitronics Dealer

 


NanoMax™… Powerful Performance in a Tiny Footprint

09/17/2014

As security products continue to get smaller and sleeker, eDist Security continues to provide these exceptional innovations to its dealers. The NanoMax™ product line by Resolution Products – some of the smallest sensors you’ll find on the market – is now available at eDist.

Until now, selecting micro-sized sensors required you to lose features and performance, limiting when and where you could install these low profile devices. Today NanoMax™ delivers all the features of a full-sized sensor in 75% less space.

Unprecedented Features:

  • No-tool installation reduces costs and maximizes performance
  • Transmit power at the full FCC limits, providing long range and highly reliable sensors
  • 6+ year battery life (longest battery life in each class of sensor)
  • 1-inch magnet gap, make them the smallest sensors in the market
  • External contacts, battery initiation tab, provisioning, and installation all accomplished without removing the cover
  • Tape-only installation with tamper detection
  • Supports the new Resolution CryptiX™ encrypted protocol when paired with a Helix™ panel, increasing the security and account retention rates
  • Compatible with most professional security systems including Resolution Helix, Honeywell®, 2GIG®, GE®/Interlogix® and DSC® platforms

Why choose eDist as your wholesale distributor?

As a NanoMax™ distributor, eDist Security has once again delivered a solution that will drive both dealer growth and customer satisfaction. They promise to continue to provide wireless security innovations as a value added distributor of both Resolution Products and other innovative product lines in the industry.

GET STARTED TODAY!

Become a NanoMax™ Dealer

 


Feather Your Business With Nest™

09/12/2014

eDist has partnered with Nest® to bring you the Nest Learning Thermostat,™ the Nest Protect: Smoke + Carbon Monoxide™ detection system and the DropCam.

Home automation is a very lucrative and rapidly expanding business and as one of the select distributors in North America given the exclusive privilege of distributing Nest® products to dealers, we now offer you the unprecedented opportunity to get out in front of the market. All you have to do now is become a Nest Certified Pro.

The Nest Learning Thermostat™ was named #1in the industry for best selling thermostats.

The Nest Thermostat™ adapts to your changing life. It keeps you comfortable, helps you save energy and you can control it from anywhere! Nest controls half your home’s energy and can lower your heating and cooling bills by 20%!

Nest Protect™ speaks with a human voice telling you where smoke is or when carbon monoxide levels are rising. If it’s just a nuisance alarm, like burning popcorn, Heads-Up allows you to silence Nest Protect.

Dropcam is a cloud-based Wi-Fi video monitoring service with free live streaming, two-way talk and remote viewing that makes it easy to stay connected with places, people and pets, no matter where you are.

Signing up for the Nest® Certification Program is a simple ten-step process that can be completed in minutes. As a Nest® Certified Pro you will enjoy Pro Dealer pricing, a personal use program, online marketing and a customer referral database invaluable to a growing business! Nest® is committed to providing technology that is “simple, fresh and helpful.”

Committed to Your Success

eDist Security is the premier wholesale distributor for over 250 vendors in industries such as IP Video Surveillance and Home Automation. As a preferred Nest® Distributor, eDist Security is constantly working with vendors such as Nest® to provide training, certifications and counter days which keep both the sales staff and dealers up to date on the latest advances in technology.

Become a Nest™ Certified Pro Today!

 


Back to school means your family is going in all directions!

08/20/2014

The IQ solution from Qolsys is the “smart home” solution for staying connected with your children and your home.

Security today is about more than just preventing intrusions. It’s about tapping into innovations that work with your lifestyle to make security and home management easier. eDist, one of the largest Qolsys wholesale distributors, is featuring the IQ Panel and its an all-in-one solution platform.

The IQ Panel will keep you connected to your home and family by turning your mobile device into a powerful window that lets you stay in control no matter where you are. The IQ Solution is built on the Android platform and uses Alarm.com, the industry’s most reliable, advanced and interactive security service platform. eDist carries the Qolsys complete line of defense with a the full line of Qolsys accessories including sensors, cameras, door locks, thermostats, outlets, switches, and more.

  • Check in using your Alarm.com when a motion sensor is tripped. Was it the kids getting home from school?
  • Unlock the door for the cable man and lock the door behind him when he leaves.
  • Turn down your thermostat an hour before you leave work and come home to a cool, dry climate.
  • Turn the lights on while you’re away on vacation to deter thieves from targeting your home.

As the leading Qolsys distributor the eDist team is made up of industry experienced and technically proficient sales associates and we have been serving the independent dealer for over 40 years.

Start growing your business today with custom marketing. As a qualified eDist Partner you will receive specialized Qolsys marketing. Look forward to building traffic and profits for your business by taking advantage of the marketing portal.

With the school year just getting underway, this is the perfect time to reach out to your existing customer base or to find new clients in your area by promising the control and peace of mind that comes from having the Qolsys IQ System in their home.

Become a Qolsys Dealer Today